Newsletter Archives > Monthly Health Newsletter: February 2018 Health Newsletter

February 2018 Health Newsletter

Current Articles

» Survival Tips for Standing in Line This Holiday Season
» VA Chiropractors To Perform Physical Exams for Military Veteran Truck Drivers
» Chiropractic First - Surgery Last
» Appreciate your Doctor of Chiropractic

Survival Tips for Standing in Line This Holiday Season

The holiday season is here and with it comes lots of reasons for good cheer…but it can also bring added demands and stress for our bodies. Whether you're shopping for presents, waiting to pick up the perfect dessert or checking out a holiday performance, chances are you'll spend a good deal of time standing in line this season.  The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) offers the following tips to help you avoid muscle cramps, neck stiffness and back pain while waiting in line.  First, dress the part. If you're planning to spend the day shopping or strolling around town checking out the holiday displays, wear comfortable, supportive shoes—not high heels. It's also a good idea to dress in layers so that you will be comfortable going from outdoors to indoors, and vise-versa. And leave huge shoulder bags at home; bring only those items that are necessary for your day—wallet, keys, cell phone—and consider carrying a fanny pack or a backpack rather than a one-shoulder purse.  Once you're actually in line, there are several stretches that you can do to keep your legs from cramping and your back from aching. Start with your toes and work your way up:

  • Spread your toes out as wide as you can and hold for a few seconds and then bring them back to neutral.
  • Stand on one foot while you rotate the opposite ankle and then switch legs.
  • To stretch your calves, lean forward on your toes keeping your legs straight.
  • Bend your knees a little bit, just 5 to 10 degrees, and then straighten them.     
  • Tighten the muscles in your thighs and bottom and hold for 5 seconds and then release.
  • Tuck your butt underneath while sticking your bellybutton out then switch and stick your butt out. This pelvic tilt can be a very small movement, but it is great for taking the pressure off your lower back.    
  • Roll your shoulders backwards several times and then push your shoulder blades together to stretch out your chest.    
  • Open your hands as wide as you can and then gently close them.    
  • In addition to stretching, shift your weight and alter your stance every 3 to 5 minutes to give your body a postural break.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: American Chiropractic Association. November 03, 2010.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2010

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VA Chiropractors To Perform Physical Exams for Military Veteran Truck Drivers

President Trump has signed into law the Job for Our Heroes Act, which includes a provision allowing chiropractors working within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to perform physical exams on veterans needing a medical certificate to operate a commercial motor vehicle. "The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) is committed to improving the health of our veterans by removing barriers and expanding access to chiropractors in the VA as well as other federal programs," said ACA President David Herd, DC.  Prior to the legislation, only 25 medical doctors within the entire VA health care system were qualified to perform the Department of Transportation (DOT) physical exams. Providers in the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners—including more than 3,500 chiropractors—were excluded from providing the exams to truck drivers who receive their care through the VA health care system. Consequently, the drivers were burdened with limited access and increased wait times, and were forced to look outside the VA and pay for eligible health professionals to perform the required physical. By increasing the number of health professionals, including chiropractors, who may conduct the physical exams, the new law will the ease the process, as well as save time and money, for veterans seeking commercial driver’s licenses.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: online, January 11, 2018.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2018

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Chiropractic First - Surgery Last
Many individuals suffering from back, neck and spinal-related conditions experience mild to moderate, even severe chronic pain. Often, a sense of frustration and hopelessness lead many to obtain surgery in their quest for relief before considering other forms of safer, less invasive care. The medical research discussing the complications of surgery are loaded with statements including, "Surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal surgery can result in several serious secondary complications, such as pseudoarthrosis, neurological injury, paralysis, sepsis, and death." Certainly there are conditions that may require surgical intervention. However, it's essential to first ensure that other forms of safe, non-invasive, mainstream interventions such as chiropractic care have first been considered, especially given the severity of complications related to spinal surgeries. If you or a loved one are experiencing neck, back and/or spinal related pain and/or discomfort, or, perhaps it's simply time for a checkup, call your local doctor of chiropractic today. Most chiropractors offer no obligation consultations allowing an opportunity to meet with the doctor and discuss your case prior to making any decisions about care.

Source: The Spine Journal. Vol. 15 Iss. 3, March 1, 2015.
Copyright: LLC 2015

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Appreciate your Doctor of Chiropractic

Did you know chiropractors are in a high-risk group for low back disorders. Ironically, low back problems are the most common conditions chiropractors treat. While providing patient care, chiropractors can place a great deal of stress on their back and spine. So next time you see your chiropractor working hard to get and keep you well, give them a friendly pat on the back… they deserve it!

Source: J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2003;26:25-33
Copyright: 2003

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